Northwest RiverPartners is an alliance of farmers, utilities, ports and businesses that promote the economic and environmental benefits of the Columbia and Snake Rivers and salmon recovery policies based on sound science. List of members.

  Did You Know?
Salmon runs vary from year to year; yet the dams these fish traverse have been in place for nearly 75 years. Researchers believe ocean conditions are a primary reason for the ups and downs.
About 7.8 million acres of land is irrigated in the Columbia Basin, allowing farmers to feed the Northwest and the world.
The Northwest is the third largest grain exporter in the world and the number one wheat and barley exporter in the USA.
Over $20 billion worth of cargo is shipped annually down the Columbia and Snake rivers.
Hydro operations saved Portland, Oregon from an estimated $3.2 billion in additional flood damage in 1996.
Northwest families and businesses have spent over $12 billion on fish and wildlife protection and mitigation measures over the past three decades.
A Power Planning Council analysis concluded that CO2 emissions go up by 4.4 million tons each year from spilling water at the federal dams to move young fish downstream.
In recent years, fish and wildlife costs equal about one-third of total BPA power costs.
Young salmon are surviving the trip downstream through the eight federal dams at higher levels now than when passing only four dams in the 1970s.
Early estimates show that young salmon migrating downstream past the eight Snake and Columbia River dams to the ocean had the second highest survival rates since 1999.
There are more fish in the Columbia River today than at any time since the first dam was built at Bonneville in 1938. Many are hatchery fish, but wild populations are trending upward too.
The latest federal plan to help 13 protected salmon species includes hydro, hatchery, and habitat actions costing Northwest consumers some $10 billion more in the next decade.
Fish and wildlife costs now make up 10 percent to 20 percent of families’ and businesses’ electricity bills in the region, depending on the electric service provider.
Salmon runs vary from year to year; yet the dams these fish traverse have been in place for nearly 75 years. Researchers believe ocean conditions are a primary reason for the ups and downs.
About 7.8 million acres of land is irrigated in the Columbia Basin, allowing farmers to feed the Northwest and the world.
 

Latest NWRP News

Public Opinion polling summary 2015

NWRP Continues Campaign to Tell the Real Dam Story

About NW RiverPartners Brochure

Columbia River Basin FAST FACTS


Snow Melts, Rain Falls, Rivers Form and Magic Happens in the Northwest - April Newsletter

Salmon Recovery: Dams Are an Easy Scapegoat - January Newsletter

A Reason to Celebrate: 2014 Salmon Returns Break Modern-Day Records - October Newsletter

"The Birds" are Back! - August Newsletter

 

Media

Strong Runs of Columbia River Chinook Projected   More

More Big Numbers Expected for 2015 Fall Chinook Return to Columbia   More

Navigation Supporters Celebrate as Snake River Dredging is Scheduled to Begin   More

Biologists Optimistic About [2015] Columbia Spring Chinook Run   More