New Renewables: Not What You Might Think

Hydro remains the region’s reliable source of carbon-free energy In a recent opinion piece for the Oregonian, Wendy Gerlitz of the Northwest Energy Coalition (NWEC) opined that the region must choose between healthy populations of wild salmon and removing the Snake River dams. NWEC’s solution is to remove the dams and replace them with more energy conservation and new wind/solar …

Richelle BeckNew Renewables: Not What You Might Think

In Sockeye Crisis, Dams Helped – But Indecision Didn’t

Last year’s massive die-off of adult sockeye salmon returning via the Columbia and Snake rivers to their spawning grounds was tragic. Mother Nature, in the form of low river flows and unusually persistent, hot temperatures created a lethal situation. Fortunately, the Columbia Basin’s spring/summer Chinook and steelhead stocks, which are hardier than sockeye and migrate earlier in the season, fared …

Richelle BeckIn Sockeye Crisis, Dams Helped – But Indecision Didn’t

Salmon Reintroduction: There’s More to the Story

The idea to reintroduce salmon above Washington’s Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has been making headlines lately. Understandably, Native American Tribes near those dams are leading the charge. They have been most affected by the salmon loss caused by the dams’ construction. The Tribes maintain that reintroduction and passage—getting the fish past these towering dams—is newly feasible. It must …

Richelle BeckSalmon Reintroduction: There’s More to the Story

Hydropower and Salmon Successfully Co-exist

This thoughtful guest opinion by Roger Gray, Jeff Nelson and Matt Michel, supported by six other General Managers of locally-owned utilities near Eugene, ran in the Register Guard on October 28, 2015. It responds to an Associated Press article on Snake River dam removal that ran in several Northwest newspapers earlier this month. As noted in the recent Register-Guard article …

Richelle BeckHydropower and Salmon Successfully Co-exist

Sockeye Struggling to Survive – Further Fishing Limits May Be Needed

A year that promised a near repeat of last year’s exceptional salmon returns has instead brought catastrophic losses to the Northwest. High river temperatures, caused by low snowpack and a lack of cold-water runoff combined with severe, prolonged hot weather, are punishing the returning fish, especially sockeye and sturgeon. River temperatures are 2 to 4 degrees higher than normal, and …

Richelle BeckSockeye Struggling to Survive – Further Fishing Limits May Be Needed
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New Renewables: Not What You Might Think

Hydro remains the region’s reliable source of carbon-free energy In a recent opinion piece for the Oregonian, Wendy Gerlitz of the Northwest Energy Coalition (NWEC) opined that the region must choose between healthy populations of wild salmon and removing the Snake River dams. NWEC’s solution is to remove the dams and replace them with more energy conservation and new wind/solar …

Richelle BeckNew Renewables: Not What You Might Think

In Sockeye Crisis, Dams Helped – But Indecision Didn’t

Last year’s massive die-off of adult sockeye salmon returning via the Columbia and Snake rivers to their spawning grounds was tragic. Mother Nature, in the form of low river flows and unusually persistent, hot temperatures created a lethal situation. Fortunately, the Columbia Basin’s spring/summer Chinook and steelhead stocks, which are hardier than sockeye and migrate earlier in the season, fared …

Richelle BeckIn Sockeye Crisis, Dams Helped – But Indecision Didn’t

Salmon Reintroduction: There’s More to the Story

The idea to reintroduce salmon above Washington’s Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has been making headlines lately. Understandably, Native American Tribes near those dams are leading the charge. They have been most affected by the salmon loss caused by the dams’ construction. The Tribes maintain that reintroduction and passage—getting the fish past these towering dams—is newly feasible. It must …

Richelle BeckSalmon Reintroduction: There’s More to the Story

Hydropower and Salmon Successfully Co-exist

This thoughtful guest opinion by Roger Gray, Jeff Nelson and Matt Michel, supported by six other General Managers of locally-owned utilities near Eugene, ran in the Register Guard on October 28, 2015. It responds to an Associated Press article on Snake River dam removal that ran in several Northwest newspapers earlier this month. As noted in the recent Register-Guard article …

Richelle BeckHydropower and Salmon Successfully Co-exist

Sockeye Struggling to Survive – Further Fishing Limits May Be Needed

A year that promised a near repeat of last year’s exceptional salmon returns has instead brought catastrophic losses to the Northwest. High river temperatures, caused by low snowpack and a lack of cold-water runoff combined with severe, prolonged hot weather, are punishing the returning fish, especially sockeye and sturgeon. River temperatures are 2 to 4 degrees higher than normal, and …

Richelle BeckSockeye Struggling to Survive – Further Fishing Limits May Be Needed
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Poll Shows Growing Support for Hydropower

This week as we mark Earth Day, it’s especially important to recognize that the Northwest is a special place where hydropower provides 90 percent of our renewable energy and keeps the air clean. It also remains the backbone of the region’s economy, producing affordable reliable power that help families and keeps existing businesses competitive and attracts new ones. The public …

nwrpPoll Shows Growing Support for Hydropower
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Salmon Recovery: Dams Are an Easy Scapegoat

The Seattle Times attached this headline to an opinion piece I wrote in November on salmon restoration efforts in the Northwest – and they got it exactly right. Fish advocates and commercial fishing groups once again are suing over a federal salmon plan, called a Biological Opinion (BiOp). The BiOp prescribes how the federal dams on the Columbia and Snake …

nwrpSalmon Recovery: Dams Are an Easy Scapegoat
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